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First online Extemporaneous Speech "regional"


Extemporaneous Speech is one of our most popular events at State. While it does not require hours of work ahead of time, practice is definitely recommended. For this “regional” event, please follow the guidelines below, to get the maximum benefit from this event.

  1. BEFORE you look at the topics listed, collect the following items: writing utensil, 3x5 notecard (or small piece of paper), stopwatch of some kind, and a recording device.

  2. Once you are prepared, look at the three topics. Choose one.

  3. Take 15 minutes to write your speech on your notecard. DO NOT look up any information. The point is to write this speech on your own!

  4. Suggestion - start with an outline of your speech. Then write an opening and a conclusion. If you still have time, make a list of talking points. It’s pretty much impossible to actually write a 3-5 minute speech in 15 minutes.

  5. As soon as your 15 minutes is done, you need to give your speech to your recording device. You can have someone record you, or just set up your phone to record.

  6. The goal is a speech that is at least 3 minutes long, and no more than 5 minutes long. Deductions are given for speeches that are too short, or too long.

  7. Once you are done, email the file to speeches@washingtontsa.org, or text it to WTSA at 541-490-8466. While you will not identify yourself during your speech, you do need to send your name and school with your speech file, so that we can give you feedback.

  8. Good luck. Please don’t cheat. The goal is to give yourself practice for the actual event at the State Conference.

TOPICS

Charter vs. public vs. private, Basic Ed vs. CTE, teacher shortages vs. closing teaching programs - Is our education system broken, and how can we fix it?

Millions of people are impacted by cancer. TSA partners with the American Cancer Society. What can Washington TSA chapters do, during the next two months and at the State Conference, as ACS fundraising/awareness activities?

Drones can deliver packages, survey downed power lines, and help catch criminals. How do we utilize the amazing capabilities of UAVs, and still protect the privacy and safety of the American people?